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All you missed at Frieze Art Fair New York

 

The unmissable contemporary-art fair took place from 14 to 17 May in New York. Numéro reports back from four hectic days.

Kamel Mennour's booth including sculptures by Petrit Halilaj and paintings by Latifa Echakhch

Carissa Rodriguez, It’s Symptomatic / What Would Edith Say, (2015), Digital C-print on aluminium, 152,4 x 101,6 cm. Galerie Karma International.

“Do you know why the Europeans wanted to create Frieze New York after creating Frieze London? They were looking for a new excuse to hang out in Manhattan clubs in the springtime.” During the evening receptions at the Frieze Art Fair New York, American guests never tired of this little joke, which has been doing the rounds ever since the original Frieze, in London, gave birth to a little sister Stateside (although she’s not so little now!). But it has to be said that it was Europeans who contributed enormously to the fair’s success this year, and not only in the clubs.

 

Just inside the (south) entrance, it was a European gallery that was displaying the one work not to be missed: Oslo’s Standard had the excellent idea of installing a giant screen to show Ian Cheng’s Emissary in Squat of Gods. The 31-year-old American prodigy particularly stands out in his use of new technology, here exhibiting a video which was nothing less than a computer programme proposing an epic journey among prehistoric humans. Based on psychologist Julian Jaynes’s theory that man wasn’t really “conscious,” and realized with graphics recalling 90s computer games, the piece masterfully used the possibilities of the digital camera (to the point of passing through pixelated volcanic scenery) to evoke the wanderings of these early humans. It’s a brilliant study of mankind’s accession to consciousness, or a lack of it…

Instagram Paintings by Richard Prince on Gagosian Gallery booth.

A propos, as of 13 May the privileged few invited to the preview were much more interested in having their photo taken in front of Instagram-inspired paintings by Richard Prince. The star artist had been amusing himself posting online comments (for example under a selfie by model Lara Stone), taking screen shots, and then reproducing them as paintings. Obviously it’s less complicated and more bankable than a computer programme exploring humanity’s dawning consciousness. A little further on, Jonathan Horowitz’s “creative workshop” also attracted the crowds. The prestigious guests all had to draw black circles of a particular diameter that were afterwards put up on a wall, and each received a cheque for $20 in return. It was an excellent idea worthy of an advertising agency – consumers are personally involved and remunerated. Only here they’re called collectors.

Ryan Gander, Ftt, Ft, Ftt, Ftt, Ffttt, Ftt (2010), arrows. Lisson Gallery.

Marian Goodman also stood out by dedicating her stand, as she usually does, to one single artist. Giuseppe Penone’s huge nature pictures were impressive, to the point that one of them was rumoured to be going for $1 million. The French were not to be outdone: on Kamel Mennour’s stand, the duo formed by Petrit Halilaj and Latifa Echakhch (winner of the 2013 Marcel Duchamp Prize) appeared particularly pertinent and convincing – two rising stars who are well on the way to finding a permanent place in the firmament.

Cory Archangel, D'oooh (2014), Santa Cruz skateboard, foam pool noodles, armbands, 140 cm high. Lisson Gallery.

Among the hot names, Ryan Gander - who put on a great show at Gb Agency in Paris in 2014 - was creating a buzz on the Lisson Gallery stand, where Cory Archangel made visitors smile with a Homer Simpson piece (you found yourself literally saying out loud the character’s famous D’oooh after which the work is named). Also of note were Petra Cortright’s rainbow videos at Foxy Production, Mark Flood at Peres Project, and Eddie Peake at White Cube....

Sam Falls, Untitled (George) (2014), glass, helium, balloons, neon. Galleria Franco Noero

 

 

Sam Falls had put together a very poetic installation of balloons and fluorescent tubes for Italian gallerist Franco Noero, with whom he currently has an exhibition in Turin. But the most remarked-upon figure was without contest Korakrit Arunanondchai, whose massage chairs, accompanied by hypnotic music, were available throughout the fair. Now living in New York, where he’s represented by the Clearing Gallery, the Thai artist will be exhibiting his eccentric, explosive aesthetic at the Palais de Tokyo in June. We’ll see you there.

 

By Thibaut Wychowanok

 

 

http://friezenewyork.com/

 

Korakrit Arunanondchai, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, du 24 juin au 13 septembre 2009. http://www.palaisdetokyo.com/

Giuseppe Penone at Marian Goodman Gallery's booth.

Paola Pivi at galerie Perrotin's booth.

Homepage : Paola Pivi at galerie Perrotin's booth.

Interview with Takashi Murakami, a pop icon
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Interview with Takashi Murakami, a pop icon

Art Drawing from Japanese popular culture and the world of manga, his spectacular artworks have brought him global fame and have been shown at such diverse and prestigious locations as New York’s MoMA, London’s Tate Modern and the Château de Versailles. Takashi Murakami was also a pioneer with respect to his iconoclastic fashion collaborations, an approach that he continues to explore today by co-producing exhibitions with the designer Virgil Abloh. Drawing from Japanese popular culture and the world of manga, his spectacular artworks have brought him global fame and have been shown at such diverse and prestigious locations as New York’s MoMA, London’s Tate Modern and the Château de Versailles. Takashi Murakami was also a pioneer with respect to his iconoclastic fashion collaborations, an approach that he continues to explore today by co-producing exhibitions with the designer Virgil Abloh.

Albert Oehlen, the painter of pop culture exhibited at Palazzo Grassi in Venice
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Albert Oehlen, the painter of pop culture exhibited at Palazzo Grassi in Venice

Art Like a free-jazz jam session, his canvases bring together a whirlwind of references, from pop culture to figuration to abstraction, blended in hyper-controlled chaos. François Pinault’s Venice museum is currently celebrating the work of German painter Albert Oehlen. Like a free-jazz jam session, his canvases bring together a whirlwind of references, from pop culture to figuration to abstraction, blended in hyper-controlled chaos. François Pinault’s Venice museum is currently celebrating the work of German painter Albert Oehlen.

Who is Yuko Hasegawa, a japanese art authority ?
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Who is Yuko Hasegawa, a japanese art authority ?

Art 2018 is a great year for japanese art in France, with a whole host of concerts, dance shows, theatrical events and exhibitions being planned. Top of the bill is hang at the Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, the work of Yuko Hasegawa, the greatly respected chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo. 2018 is a great year for japanese art in France, with a whole host of concerts, dance shows, theatrical events and exhibitions being planned. Top of the bill is hang at the Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, the work of Yuko Hasegawa, the greatly respected chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.

How Art Basel moved from must-see fair to global brand
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How Art Basel moved from must-see fair to global brand

Art Basel, Miami, Hong Kong and soon Buenos Aires – Art Basel keeps on expanding its horizons, to the point where its name now rivals big global brands like Coca Cola in fame and recognition. Basel, Miami, Hong Kong and soon Buenos Aires – Art Basel keeps on expanding its horizons, to the point where its name now rivals big global brands like Coca Cola in fame and recognition.

Artists and hackers, they hijack new technologies
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Artists and hackers, they hijack new technologies

Art Algorithms, coding, data, hardware – what use (or misuse) can artists make of all these new technological tools? This is the fascinating question asked by a double exhibition at the centre pompidou, to which Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda has been invited as guest of honour. Algorithms, coding, data, hardware – what use (or misuse) can artists make of all these new technological tools? This is the fascinating question asked by a double exhibition at the centre pompidou, to which Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda has been invited as guest of honour.