15 May

Louis Vuitton takes us on a journey to Kyoto for its 2018 resort collection

 

It was the Miho museum in Kyoto where Nicolas Ghesquière chose to show his Louis Vuitton  2018 resort collection this Sunday May 14th, inspired by ancestral Japanese culture, it’s urbanism and the surrounding nature.

By The editorial team

  • 1/55
  • 2/55
  • 3/55
  • 4/55
  • 5/55
  • 6/55
  • 7/55
  • 8/55
  • 9/55
  • 10/55
  • 11/55
  • 12/55
  • 13/55
  • 14/55
  • 15/55
  • 16/55
  • 17/55
  • 18/55
  • 19/55
  • 20/55
  • 21/55
  • 22/55
  • 23/55
  • 24/55
  • 25/55
  • 26/55
  • 27/55
  • 28/55
  • 29/55
  • 30/55
  • 31/55
  • 32/55
  • 33/55
  • 34/55
  • 35/55
  • 36/55
  • 37/55
  • 38/55
  • 39/55
  • 40/55
  • 41/55
  • 42/55
  • 43/55
  • 44/55
  • 45/55
  • 46/55
  • 47/55
  • 48/55
  • 49/55
  • 50/55
  • 51/55
  • 52/55
  • 53/55
  • 54/55
  • 55/55
1/55
  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

  • For the Louis Vuitton 2018 resort collection, Nicolas Ghesquière chose the Miho museum in Kyoto as his venue for the event, a symbol of the harmony between Japanese modernity and its natural world. “I’d visited the Miho Museum a few years ago and was fascinated by the way this building was integrated into such a landscape and by the thought processes of I. M. Pei (the museum’s architect) on the harmony between architecture and nature. It led me to reflect on a Parisian take on traditional Japanese harmony. I know Japan very well. I came here for my very first inspirational trips twenty years ago and have been coming back regularly ever since. This collection is a sort of culmination of everything I’ve been thinking about Japan for years, everything that is anchored deep inside of me,” the designer explained.

     

    Each garment evokes samurai, figurative etchings, landscapes engraved in ink, ceremonial costumes and martial arts outfits. Through this collection, composed of trouser suits, jersey and leather intertwined sweaters, evening dresses and clutch bags that reinterpret Kabuki masks, Nicolas Ghesquière pays tribute to the drama of Kurosawa’s movies and the unique melancholia of those by Kitano. 

Louis Vuitton, cruise collection 2018

NuméroNews