22 February

The rebirth of Mackintosh, or how the specialist waterproof garment became the height of cool…

 

After notable collaborations with Vetements and J.W. Anderson, the famous Mackintosh brand presents a complete and very successful collection in Paris by its new designer Kiko Kostadinov.

By Léa Zetlaoui

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  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

  • It was in Glasgow in 1823, a good twenty years before the advent of Haute Couture in Paris, that Charles Rennie Macintosh patented his waterproof garment. Rubberised cotton, two layers of chemically welded fabric and perfectly waterproof, the Mackintosh coat was a model of technical success. Traversing time and trends to become a timeless classic just like a Burberry trench or Levi’s jeans, Mackintosh has never stopped perfecting its manufacturing processes and today luxury brands including Céline and Louis Vuitton regularly call upon its unique savoir-faire. 

     

    While the Scottish label can boast about collaborating with such big names in the fashion and luxury industry (especially JW Anderson) it was its appearance on the runway at the Vetement show that really upped its edginess. Ever loyal to its custom of reworking cuts and reinterpreting clothes, the collective led by Demna Gvasalia gave us a disproportionately oversized version with sloping shoulders and a maximal desirability.

     

    In 2016 the Scottish brand turned a corner with the appointment of designer Kiko Kostadinov and took the opportunity to launch a new more fashion-forward line, Mackintosh 0001. A graduate of Central St Martin’s, the Bulgarian coupled workwear with streetwear from the word go, an ideal combination to push the new Mackintosh into the spotlight once more. In ten unisex silhouettes in an understated palette, Kiko Kostadinov delivered his vision of Winter 2017: a complete wardrobe composed of sweaters, jackets, suits, coats, noble cashmeres and wools as well as an incomparable savoir-faire known for its exactitude when it comes to cut and details. 

     

     

    MORE: Nikelab x Acronym winter 2016 collection

     

    WE RECOMMEND: Fetish object of the week: the Pierre Hardy sandal

     

     

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