772

An encounter with Fakear, animal electro revelation

 

Young French electro-music revelation Fakear is about to release Animal, a first album filled with sunshine whose sensual beats and subtle melodies take the listener on a trippy, poetic journey.

Photo: Boris Allin.

Called to stardom in 2014 thanks to his track La Lune rousse (which was viewed nearly four-million times), Théo Le Vigoureux (his real name) gave a triumphant concert in October 2015 at Paris’s Olympia, which was packed to the rafters for the occasion. Powerfully evocative, his tracks recall the humanist, ecologist mangas of Japanese filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke) and the mysterious jungle of Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Uncle Boonmee, Tropical Malady). Numéro met up with the young musician who is taking electro back to nature.

 

Numéro: The title of your album, Animal, sounds like a manifesto. What’s behind this idea of plunging electro music into nature?

Fakear: I want to remind everyone that man belongs to the animal kingdom, and that we are creatures who are profoundly linked to nature. I come from Normandy, and now I live in Switzerland, in a little village of 500 people. The city has never been easy for me, quite the contrary. Cities cause us to lose our individuality by making us anonymous. In one sense, they drive us mad. That typically urban depression and cynicism becomes the only refuge. My main ambition is to re-establish the essential link that unites us with our original environment. In the middle of the forest, at night, on drugs − that’s probably the best way to enjoy the album!

Your use of “primitive” sounds, of noises from tropical forests, but also your treatment of voices like animal cries create a disturbing feeling of exoticism.

My music seems exotic because it offers a return to nature, something which most people no longer have any connection with. You might go on holiday in the middle of nature, but none of us really lives in it anymore. Besides, I never deliberately seek exoticism. When I choose an “ethnic”-sounding instrument or a natural sound, it’s always because of its musical qualities.

Photo: Boris Allin.

 

 

You’ve been working on the album for over a year. How has your sound evolved?

At the beginning, I imagined a very subtle sound, in the same spirit as the label Ninja Tune. I was looking to move away from the pop format. And then I fell in love. I recorded seven or eight tracks in the space of a month, and the album took on a more luminous dimension, and gained in purity. My music is always a snapshot of a very personal moment, in this case my meeting the person in question, and my departure for Switzerland that followed. A solar storm. More recently, I added two new tracks which demonstrate the recent evolution of my music: more hovering, more synthetic and more spatial. Less ethnic. The sound has gained in breadth and is closer to American productions than to the light English dubstep which people have often associated me with.

 

 

Your very eclectic influences go from the “French touch” of Daft Punk’s Discovery period to trip-hop of the 2000s (Zero 7, Morcheeba) via world music of the Deep Forest kind…

This open-mindedness probably comes from my parents, who are both musicians. My father founded a school of music based in alternative teaching methods. Music must be a passion before becoming a theoretical apprenticeship. The moment it felt like a constraint, I stopped everything. The idea of being obliged to do something has always been unbearable to me.

 

 

Animal, by Fakear (nowadays records/mercury), out on June 3rd.

 

 

Interview by Thibaut Wychowanok

4 things you should know about Lana Del Rey, the vintage star with an irresistible pout
718

4 things you should know about Lana Del Rey, the vintage star with an irresistible pout

Music With her vintage allure and her throbbing vocals, Lana Del Ray is nothing short of captivating. Just a week after the unexpected release of her “Mariners Apartment Complex”, she unveils “Venice Bitch”, a 10-minute track that wraps up summer perfectly, while announcing her sixth album, “Normal Fucking Rockwell”. Numéro looks at four must-know facts about the diva with the irresistible pout. With her vintage allure and her throbbing vocals, Lana Del Ray is nothing short of captivating. Just a week after the unexpected release of her “Mariners Apartment Complex”, she unveils “Venice Bitch”, a 10-minute track that wraps up summer perfectly, while announcing her sixth album, “Normal Fucking Rockwell”. Numéro looks at four must-know facts about the diva with the irresistible pout.

With “Love S.O.S.”, Justice serves up a cocktail of strip-tease, voyeurism and violence
475

With “Love S.O.S.”, Justice serves up a cocktail of strip-tease, voyeurism and violence

Music Currently promoting “Woman Worldwide”, the live version of their “Woman” album, the Justice duo have delivered a video that is as sexy as it is violent to accompany their new track, “Love S.O.S.”. Currently promoting “Woman Worldwide”, the live version of their “Woman” album, the Justice duo have delivered a video that is as sexy as it is violent to accompany their new track, “Love S.O.S.”.

Lana Del Rey, rough seas and butterflies in her new video for “Mariners Apartment Complex”
571

Lana Del Rey, rough seas and butterflies in her new video for “Mariners Apartment Complex”

Music Over a year after the release of “Lust For Life”, Lana Del Rey is back with “Mariners Apartment Complex”, a searing guitar ballad accompanied by a vintage-look black and white video directed by her sister. Over a year after the release of “Lust For Life”, Lana Del Rey is back with “Mariners Apartment Complex”, a searing guitar ballad accompanied by a vintage-look black and white video directed by her sister.

Meeting with The Blaze, the duo that shines French electro abroad
748

Meeting with The Blaze, the duo that shines French electro abroad

Music After only a few tracks and just a couple of arthouse videos, French twosome The Blaze are being touted as the next big thing on the electro scene. Ahead of the release of their first album, the haunting Dancehall, cousins Guillaume and Jonathan, a generally shy and discreet duo, agreed to discuss their work with Numéro. After only a few tracks and just a couple of arthouse videos, French twosome The Blaze are being touted as the next big thing on the electro scene. Ahead of the release of their first album, the haunting Dancehall, cousins Guillaume and Jonathan, a generally shy and discreet duo, agreed to discuss their work with Numéro.

Meet Kiddy Smile, the queer herald of our times
874

Meet Kiddy Smile, the queer herald of our times

Music The DJ, singer and voguing star set the Élysée Palace on fire last June. Now he’s getting ready to conquer the world with a first album, caught between flamboyant house and a queer pop hymn. A future legend who lent himself to a fashion shoot for Numéro. The DJ, singer and voguing star set the Élysée Palace on fire last June. Now he’s getting ready to conquer the world with a first album, caught between flamboyant house and a queer pop hymn. A future legend who lent himself to a fashion shoot for Numéro.

Christine & the Queens as an S&M prostitute in her new video for “5 dollars”
674

Christine & the Queens as an S&M prostitute in her new video for “5 dollars”

Music After “Damn, dis-moi” and “Doesn't Matter (Voleur de soleil)”, Christine & the Queens, now known as Chris, is releasing a third single “5 dollars” with a video in which she plays a high-class S&M prostitute getting ready for work. After “Damn, dis-moi” and “Doesn't Matter (Voleur de soleil)”, Christine & the Queens, now known as Chris, is releasing a third single “5 dollars” with a video in which she plays a high-class S&M prostitute getting ready for work.