713

François Pinault announced the opening of a museum at the Board of Trade of Paris

 

Wednesday, April 27th, alongside the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, and his son François-Henri Pinault, the famous collector announced that a new museum was to house his collection in 2018, in the Board of Trade.

Courtesy Ville de Paris.

 

“An exceptional gift to Parisians and tourists from around the world,” is how the Mayor of Paris welcomed the announcement of the 2018 opening of the Board of Trade at the town hall today. Following the failure ten years ago to install the Pinault collection on the île Seguin - going to Venice instead - the French capital is ready for revenge. Located but a stone’s throw away from the newly renovated Halles, the museum, “will sit in the heart of a Paris on the move” says Anne Hidalgo. “Art won’t save the world but it’s one of the best weapons to push back obscurant ideas and barbarism”, she added in reference to recent attacks on Paris and Brussels. 

 

François Pinault enthusiastically announced that the Japanese architect Tadao Ando would be responsible for the new museum, having also collaborated with him in Venice. Calling for “an architectural gesture of great scope respecting heritage and history, and which we will still be talking about at the end of this century”, the Breton businessman emphasised, and not without humour, that he didn’t want this museum to become an “elephant’s graveyard” too quickly. “The greatest contemporary artists in the collection will be present here starting with Pierre Huyghe and Charles Ray”, he confirmed.

 

Martin Bethenot, head of the Venetian institution, will now oversee the Paris-Venice ensemble. “A global project that will take a nothing away from Venice”, he explains. François-Henri Pinault concluded the announcement insisting that the “transformation of the all consuming passion of [his] father is a truly family adventure.”

 

 

By Thibaut Wychowanok

Tomás Saraceno's spiders at the Palais de Tokyo
843

Tomás Saraceno's spiders at the Palais de Tokyo

Art His Berlin atelier houses one of the most important collections of spider’s webs in the world – which is perhaps only normal given that Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno, born in 1973, has become famous for the spider’s webs that he exhibits in open metal cubes. Paris’s Palais de Tokyo is currently giving him carte blanche. His Berlin atelier houses one of the most important collections of spider’s webs in the world – which is perhaps only normal given that Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno, born in 1973, has become famous for the spider’s webs that he exhibits in open metal cubes. Paris’s Palais de Tokyo is currently giving him carte blanche.

Maurizio Cattelan gets into copy (in art) with Gucci
978

Maurizio Cattelan gets into copy (in art) with Gucci

Art Ever more committed to supporting contemporary art, Gucci and its creative director Alessandro Michele have invited artist Maurizio Cattelan to curate a thought-provoking Shanghai show about copies. Ever more committed to supporting contemporary art, Gucci and its creative director Alessandro Michele have invited artist Maurizio Cattelan to curate a thought-provoking Shanghai show about copies.

FIAC 2018 : Katharina Grosse's bonfire of colour at the Grand Palais
978

FIAC 2018 : Katharina Grosse's bonfire of colour at the Grand Palais

Art Katharina grosse transforms the world with her spray gun. Born in 1961, the german artist has splattered many a prestigious museum with her violent colours, as well as her own bedroom and even a house. She’s now been invited by the villa médicis in rome, home to the french academy, which she’s transformed into an explosive landscape made up of trunks of a pine tree planted over a century ago by ingres. Katharina grosse transforms the world with her spray gun. Born in 1961, the german artist has splattered many a prestigious museum with her violent colours, as well as her own bedroom and even a house. She’s now been invited by the villa médicis in rome, home to the french academy, which she’s transformed into an explosive landscape made up of trunks of a pine tree planted over a century ago by ingres.

Elmgreen & Dragset storm Place Vendôme: "Will humanity disappear to give way to nature?"
587

Elmgreen & Dragset storm Place Vendôme: "Will humanity disappear to give way to nature?"

Art Star fish have invaded the place vendôme! Who is responsible? Why elmgreen & dragset of course! Numéro art met up with the explosive duo, who are guests of honour at paris’s art fair fiac this autumn. Star fish have invaded the place vendôme! Who is responsible? Why elmgreen & dragset of course! Numéro art met up with the explosive duo, who are guests of honour at paris’s art fair fiac this autumn.

Numéro art reveals new cover starring artists Elmgreen & Dragset
874

Numéro art reveals new cover starring artists Elmgreen & Dragset

Art Discover Elmgreen & Dragset shot by Miles Aldridge for the cover of Numero art #3, out October 12th. Elmgreen & Dragset are taking over the place Vendôme during the FIAC and will be celebrated at Galerie Perrotin in Paris. Plus, do not miss their current show at Whitechapel Gallery in London.  Discover Elmgreen & Dragset shot by Miles Aldridge for the cover of Numero art #3, out October 12th. Elmgreen & Dragset are taking over the place Vendôme during the FIAC and will be celebrated at Galerie Perrotin in Paris. Plus, do not miss their current show at Whitechapel Gallery in London. 

Frieze London 2018 pays tribute to female artists with “Social Work”
874

Frieze London 2018 pays tribute to female artists with “Social Work”

Art During Frieze London, from 3 october to 7, a group of ten female critics and curators pays tribute to women artists whose work during the 1980s created broader support structures for those around them under the title Social Work. Curators Lydia Yee, Fatoş Üstek and Melanie Keen discuss three of the artists featured in Social Work, and suggest why it is important to re-assess their legacy three decades later. During Frieze London, from 3 october to 7, a group of ten female critics and curators pays tribute to women artists whose work during the 1980s created broader support structures for those around them under the title Social Work. Curators Lydia Yee, Fatoş Üstek and Melanie Keen discuss three of the artists featured in Social Work, and suggest why it is important to re-assess their legacy three decades later.