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Meeting up with art collectors: banker and publisher Tarek Issaoui

 

Numéro has gone in search of collectors who harbour a deep desire for contemporary art. Today Tarek Issaoui looks back at the origins of his passion that led him to artists as diverse as Uccello, Travess Smalley (photo) and Wade Guyton.

Travess Smalley (2015)

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UV coated digital pigment print mounted on aluminum frame.

From: Foxy Productions.

Tarek Issaoui's personal collection.

Cory Arcangel, 2010

Photoshop CS: 84 by 66 inches, 300 DPI, RGB, square pixels, default gradient "Blue, Red, Yellow", mousedown y=22100 x=14050, mouseup y=19700 x=1800

C-Print.

From: Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

Tarek Issaoui's personal collection.

 What is it about art that makes you so passionate?

I’ll answer with the words of Robert Filliou: “Art is what makes life more interesting than art.”

 

How did you become a collector?

I wasn’t brought up in an artistic environment. In that sense I’m completely self-taught. And in fact it’s this personal construction that interests me. I started with Uccello, Bosch, before getting into Delacroix, Gustave Moreau, Odilon Redon and then Marcel Duchamp. Once Marcel Duchamp was on board I could explore contemporary art. I started to see myself as a collector firstly of art books. At one point the postman was literally dropping off parcels of books every day and my ‘library’ now hosts hundreds of books. I was no longer satisfied with evoking a simple interest. For the actual works of art, that came gradually. I only assumed my status as art collector recently, when I started to question the coherence of the works that I’d bought over the years.

 

What was the first art work you ever bought?

It was a piece by Franck Scurti bought at a Fiac on Anne de Villepoix’s stand, when I was 26 or 27 years old. While I’ve continued to follow Scurti’s work, I bought that first piece for the wrong reasons: it features a character (“La Linea”) scared by the drop of the stock market curve. It was at the time of the dot-com bubble, and I felt pretty much the same way.

 

Which artist are you into today?

I’ve got into the work of Liz Deschenes. But accessing her pieces is not easy; you have to be very patient. Another work will undoubtedly slip by in the meantime.

The characteristic of a collection is that it has no end. That’s also what attracts us, that escaping of time. The day men will become immortal, I don't think they’ll carry on collecting.

Artie Vierkant, 2013

Image Object Monday 11 March 2013 1:15PM

UV print on dibond.

Provenance: New Galerie.

Oeuvre de la collection personnelle de Tarek Issaoui.

What work do you dream of owning?

Air de Paris by Marcel Duchamp.

 

How does the art market influence your choices?

When to comes to young artists, the market has a negative influence, in the sense that the speculative “buzz” sometimes forces me into quick decisions that I don’t want to make, for fear of the prices going through the roof. This acceleration doesn’t favour reflection. Lately there’s been an edge of hysteria. I’ve deliberately stepped out to the sidelines, hoping for a return to reason. While I wait there’s enough interesting works to explore that aren’t under scrutiny by the market. 

 

Are you close to certain galleries?

I’m not attached to the program of any gallery in particular. However I do owe a great deal to Chantal Crousel, who gave me her time and trust at a moment when I was becoming more precise in my decisions as a collector. More recently I’ve established links with the New Galerie and XPO, both of which are in Paris. We’ve started to co-edit art books, using a little publishing house I set up last year.

 

How do you stay in the loop?

Books, first and foremost. Compared to occasionally seductive works conceived for the “white cube” of a gallery, books give a sense of distance, a measure. In the context of acceleration I mentioned earlier, it’s generally a good sign to see an artist take the time to produce art books, without the expectation of instant return.

 

Within your collection, do you focus on one particular period, medium or group of artists?

In recent years, I’ve been refining the line of the collection so I can concentrate mainly on works based on a “process”, sometimes systematic, that constitutes the act of creation itself. It could be artists using the natural elements like Sam Falls or Ryan Foerster, or tapping into raw digital materials like with Cory Arcangel, Artie Vierkant or Wade Guyton. However I don’t like to focus on one particular generation. So you have both Roman Signer and Robert Heinecken featuring in my personal pantheon.

 

How do you see the future of your collection?

I don’t see a defined future, if it’s not about enlarging and clarifying. The characteristic of a collection is to have no end. That’s even what can attract us, that escaping of time. The day that men are immortal, I’m not sure they’ll carry on collecting.

 

Interview by Nicolas Trembley.

 

FIAC 2018 : Katharina Grosse's bonfire of colour at the Grand Palais
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FIAC 2018 : Katharina Grosse's bonfire of colour at the Grand Palais

Art Katharina grosse transforms the world with her spray gun. Born in 1961, the german artist has splattered many a prestigious museum with her violent colours, as well as her own bedroom and even a house. She’s now been invited by the villa médicis in rome, home to the french academy, which she’s transformed into an explosive landscape made up of trunks of a pine tree planted over a century ago by ingres. Katharina grosse transforms the world with her spray gun. Born in 1961, the german artist has splattered many a prestigious museum with her violent colours, as well as her own bedroom and even a house. She’s now been invited by the villa médicis in rome, home to the french academy, which she’s transformed into an explosive landscape made up of trunks of a pine tree planted over a century ago by ingres.

Elmgreen & Dragset storm Place Vendôme: "Will humanity disappear to give way to nature?"
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Elmgreen & Dragset storm Place Vendôme: "Will humanity disappear to give way to nature?"

Art Star fish have invaded the place vendôme! Who is responsible? Why elmgreen & dragset of course! Numéro art met up with the explosive duo, who are guests of honour at paris’s art fair fiac this autumn. Star fish have invaded the place vendôme! Who is responsible? Why elmgreen & dragset of course! Numéro art met up with the explosive duo, who are guests of honour at paris’s art fair fiac this autumn.

Numéro art reveals new cover starring artists Elmgreen & Dragset
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Numéro art reveals new cover starring artists Elmgreen & Dragset

Art Discover Elmgreen & Dragset shot by Miles Aldridge for the cover of Numero art #3, out October 12th. Elmgreen & Dragset are taking over the place Vendôme during the FIAC and will be celebrated at Galerie Perrotin in Paris. Plus, do not miss their current show at Whitechapel Gallery in London.  Discover Elmgreen & Dragset shot by Miles Aldridge for the cover of Numero art #3, out October 12th. Elmgreen & Dragset are taking over the place Vendôme during the FIAC and will be celebrated at Galerie Perrotin in Paris. Plus, do not miss their current show at Whitechapel Gallery in London. 

Frieze London 2018 pays tribute to female artists with “Social Work”
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Frieze London 2018 pays tribute to female artists with “Social Work”

Art During Frieze London, from 3 october to 7, a group of ten female critics and curators pays tribute to women artists whose work during the 1980s created broader support structures for those around them under the title Social Work. Curators Lydia Yee, Fatoş Üstek and Melanie Keen discuss three of the artists featured in Social Work, and suggest why it is important to re-assess their legacy three decades later. During Frieze London, from 3 october to 7, a group of ten female critics and curators pays tribute to women artists whose work during the 1980s created broader support structures for those around them under the title Social Work. Curators Lydia Yee, Fatoş Üstek and Melanie Keen discuss three of the artists featured in Social Work, and suggest why it is important to re-assess their legacy three decades later.

An encounter with Christian Marclay, at the Celine runway show and at the Tate Modern
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An encounter with Christian Marclay, at the Celine runway show and at the Tate Modern

Art In his first show for the house of Celine, Hedi Slimane paid a very marked tribute to the Swiss-American artist Christian Marclay by revisiting and transposing some of his works within the collection (prints on bags and clutches, embroidery on couture dresses, kimonos…) At the same time, Christian Marclay was taking hold of the Tate Modern with his major pieceThe Clock, shown for the first time in London in 2010, before winning the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale the following year. The 24-hour video installation is composed of thousands of films clips edited together to tell the actual time. The result is as captivating as it is poetic.   In his first show for the house of Celine, Hedi Slimane paid a very marked tribute to the Swiss-American artist Christian Marclay by revisiting and transposing some of his works within the collection (prints on bags and clutches, embroidery on couture dresses, kimonos…) At the same time, Christian Marclay was taking hold of the Tate Modern with his major pieceThe Clock, shown for the first time in London in 2010, before winning the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale the following year. The 24-hour video installation is composed of thousands of films clips edited together to tell the actual time. The result is as captivating as it is poetic.  

Interview with Takashi Murakami, a pop icon
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Interview with Takashi Murakami, a pop icon

Art Drawing from Japanese popular culture and the world of manga, his spectacular artworks have brought him global fame and have been shown at such diverse and prestigious locations as New York’s MoMA, London’s Tate Modern and the Château de Versailles. Takashi Murakami was also a pioneer with respect to his iconoclastic fashion collaborations, an approach that he continues to explore today by co-producing exhibitions with the designer Virgil Abloh. Drawing from Japanese popular culture and the world of manga, his spectacular artworks have brought him global fame and have been shown at such diverse and prestigious locations as New York’s MoMA, London’s Tate Modern and the Château de Versailles. Takashi Murakami was also a pioneer with respect to his iconoclastic fashion collaborations, an approach that he continues to explore today by co-producing exhibitions with the designer Virgil Abloh.