Advertising
31

Pharrell Williams par Jean-Paul Goude

 

Interview exclusive avec la superstar Pharrell Williams. Portraits Jean-Paul Goude.

For ten years, Pharrell Williams was a star producer whose magic touch defined the sound of an era. But suddenly he achieved global fame with the feel-good hit Happy. Armed with his consensual candour
and a soft felt hat, Williams has swapped backstage cool for megastar limelight.

 

In November 2013 the world’s screens were hit by an unprecedented blitzkrieg as the video for Pharrell Williams’s feel-good miracle song Happy went euphorically viral. The 24-hour-long production – which was the redoubtable brainchild of a French team ironically named We are from L.A. – seriously threatened to thwart the plans of the hardcore declinists and naysayers who thrive on the general despondency of a Western world in crisis. Will the planet actually be Happy?! Did they lie to us? In the days that followed, thousands of anonymous individuals around the globe added their own personal narratives to this collective trance, filming themselves dancing in their neighbourhoods, schools, barracks and sports fields and posting the sometimes shaky results on the internet. Spontaneously, they created the longest “chain” in digital history. A record which, as it turned out, would not last long. 

After the terrorist attacks in France on 7 January 2015, the “I am Charlie” slogan went viral and quickly outdid all the Happy hysteria, which suddenly seemed like an eerie, unwitting premonition. When we pointed out the uncanny similarities between these two tidal waves of popular fervour, Pharrell Williams admitted that he himself was troubled by it. As the vehicle driving us through Paris skirted the Place de la République, his excitement at being just inches from a page of history that had not quite yet been turned was palpable, almost childlike. His eyes seem to drink in the moment. A few minutes earlier, he had confided to us in the half light that he had never seen a phenomenon on such a breathtaking scale, praising the “incredible unity of peoples,” but without ever considering or even mentioning the reasons for this giant public outpouring. Such is Pharrell – a globalized, consensual artist, a totemic star of entertainment 2.0, a multi-brand trend leader condemned to sit on the fence in the interests of 360° business. 

Before 2013 and his breakthrough into the global spotlight, Williams spent ten years as one of R&B’s most in-demand backstage men, as well as a starlet fronting the bands The Neptunes and N*E*R*D. His first solo album, In My Mind, went entirely unnoticed on its release in 2006. His sudden blast into orbit was the result of a perfectly coordinated, albeit quite unpremeditated, three-stage process. Stage one occurred in March 2013, when he appeared alongside Canadian-American artist Robin Thicket as the cheeky vocalist on Blurred Lines, which became a worldwide hit. Stage two came a month later, when he lent his ecstatic falsetto to Get Lucky, the first single from the new Daft Punk album, Random Access Memory, which was an even bigger hit. Stage three was the release of Happy as a single – after it had stagnated for six months on the soundtrack album of the animation film Despicable Me 2 – which rocketed to the top of the charts absolutely everywhere, consecrating Williams as the new Midas of contemporary pop.

“I felt something was shifting,” Pharrell confesses modestly, “though I never thought I was the only one responsible for it. I had this incredible luck that all of these songs recorded several months earlier all came out one after the other. Blurred Lines was already ancient history for me when it became a hit. With the Robots [his name for Daft Punk] it was the same thing. I went to see them in the studio in 2012, and they suggested that I write some lyrics to an instrumental piece. It was only when I gave them what I’d written that they warned me they were counting on me for the vocals. Since the Robots have a very secret working method, I only discovered the finished song months later, at the same time as Lose Yourself to Dance, on which I also sang. It was only then that I realized that something paranormal was happening.” [Laughs.]

Retrouvez cet article dans son intégralité dans leNuméro Hommeprintemps-été 2015, disponible actuellement en kiosque et sur iPad.

→ Abonnez-vous au magazine Numéro
→ Abonnez-vous à l'application iPad Numéro

Réalisation : Alex Aikiu assisté de Vanessa Ntamack. Production : Virginie Laguens pour Belleville Hills assistée de Grâce Salemme. Numérique : Janvier Lab

Pourquoi “Magdalene” de FKA twigs est l'album de l'année
765

Pourquoi “Magdalene” de FKA twigs est l'album de l'année

Musique Après presque cinq ans d’absence et une sortie repoussée plusieurs fois, FKA twigs a enfin dévoilé vendredi dernier son deuxième album : Magdalene. En neuf titres, l’auteure-compositrice-interprète britannique prouve sans hésitation que le résultat valait l’attente, transportant les auditeurs dans une odyssée émotionnelle où elle apparaît plus vulnérable et puissante que jamais. Retour sur les ingrédients qui font le succès d'un nouvel opus aussi surprenant que magistral. Après presque cinq ans d’absence et une sortie repoussée plusieurs fois, FKA twigs a enfin dévoilé vendredi dernier son deuxième album : Magdalene. En neuf titres, l’auteure-compositrice-interprète britannique prouve sans hésitation que le résultat valait l’attente, transportant les auditeurs dans une odyssée émotionnelle où elle apparaît plus vulnérable et puissante que jamais. Retour sur les ingrédients qui font le succès d'un nouvel opus aussi surprenant que magistral.

Sofiane Pamart, le virtuose qui sidère les rappeurs
978

Sofiane Pamart, le virtuose qui sidère les rappeurs

Musique À 28 ans, le pianiste Sofiane Pamart a collaboré avec les deux tiers des rappeurs français. Pur produit du Conservatoire, le virtuose est pourtant seul sur “Planet”, un album de musique classique disponible le 22 novembre prochain. Entre souvenirs de voyage et destinations fantasmées, il transcrit en musique les panoramas du monde et chacun des douze morceaux de ce disque porte le nom d’une ville. À 28 ans, le pianiste Sofiane Pamart a collaboré avec les deux tiers des rappeurs français. Pur produit du Conservatoire, le virtuose est pourtant seul sur “Planet”, un album de musique classique disponible le 22 novembre prochain. Entre souvenirs de voyage et destinations fantasmées, il transcrit en musique les panoramas du monde et chacun des douze morceaux de ce disque porte le nom d’une ville.

Advertising
Rencontre avec Djebril Zonga, star du film “Les Misérables”
873

Rencontre avec Djebril Zonga, star du film “Les Misérables”

Cinéma Dans “Les Misérables”, le film du réalisateur Ladj Ly, qui représentera la France dans la course aux Oscars, Djebril Zonga incarne Gwada, un policier toujours sur la brèche, officiant à Montfermeil. Au sein d’un trio infernal, l’acteur campe son personnage avec une justesse unanimement saluée par la critique. Découvrez en avant-première des extraits de l'entretien à paraître dans le Numéro de décembre-janvier. Dans “Les Misérables”, le film du réalisateur Ladj Ly, qui représentera la France dans la course aux Oscars, Djebril Zonga incarne Gwada, un policier toujours sur la brèche, officiant à Montfermeil. Au sein d’un trio infernal, l’acteur campe son personnage avec une justesse unanimement saluée par la critique. Découvrez en avant-première des extraits de l'entretien à paraître dans le Numéro de décembre-janvier.

“Les Misérables” : confessions du réalisateur Ladj Ly
973

“Les Misérables” : confessions du réalisateur Ladj Ly

Cinéma Avant d’investir le cinéma, sa caméra a d’abord été pour lui un outil de vigilance citoyenne. Habitant d’une cité de Montfermeil et membre du collectif Kourtrajmé, le réalisateur Ladj Ly a commencé son parcours en filmant la vie de son quartier. Vingt ans plus tard, son film “Les Misérables”, qui raconte une bavure policière dont il a été le témoin, a été sélectionné à la surprise générale en compétition à Cannes et a décroché le prix du Jury. Ce film engagé, essentiel aujourd’hui, est désormais en lice pour la course aux Oscars, où il représente la France.  Avant d’investir le cinéma, sa caméra a d’abord été pour lui un outil de vigilance citoyenne. Habitant d’une cité de Montfermeil et membre du collectif Kourtrajmé, le réalisateur Ladj Ly a commencé son parcours en filmant la vie de son quartier. Vingt ans plus tard, son film “Les Misérables”, qui raconte une bavure policière dont il a été le témoin, a été sélectionné à la surprise générale en compétition à Cannes et a décroché le prix du Jury. Ce film engagé, essentiel aujourd’hui, est désormais en lice pour la course aux Oscars, où il représente la France. 

Takashi Murakami : “Pour dessiner ces pénis hypertrophiés, il faut être impuissant. L’imagination prend le relais.”
978

Takashi Murakami : “Pour dessiner ces pénis hypertrophiés, il faut être impuissant. L’imagination prend le relais.”

Numéro art Rencontre et carte blanche à l’artiste star japonais qui prend possession de la salle de bal de la galerie Perrotin à Paris, jusqu’au 21 décembre, avec son célèbre personnage Mr DOB, de nouvelles sculptures hypersexualisées et d’étonnantes peintures en hommage à la tradition picturale asiatique. Rencontre et carte blanche à l’artiste star japonais qui prend possession de la salle de bal de la galerie Perrotin à Paris, jusqu’au 21 décembre, avec son célèbre personnage Mr DOB, de nouvelles sculptures hypersexualisées et d’étonnantes peintures en hommage à la tradition picturale asiatique.

Caroline Polachek, de la Villa Médicis au festival Pitchfork
864

Caroline Polachek, de la Villa Médicis au festival Pitchfork

Musique Moitié du duo Chairlift pendant 12 ans, collaboratrice de Beyoncé, Charli XCX ou encore Blood Orange, Caroline Polachek est une musicienne aux multiples casquettes. A l’affiche du Pitchfork Music Festival samedi 2 novembre, cette auteure-compositrice-interprète américaine y présentera son tout premier album à son nom, “Pang”, une envolée lumineuse et lyrique qui amorce en beauté un nouveau chapitre de sa carrière. Portrait. Moitié du duo Chairlift pendant 12 ans, collaboratrice de Beyoncé, Charli XCX ou encore Blood Orange, Caroline Polachek est une musicienne aux multiples casquettes. A l’affiche du Pitchfork Music Festival samedi 2 novembre, cette auteure-compositrice-interprète américaine y présentera son tout premier album à son nom, “Pang”, une envolée lumineuse et lyrique qui amorce en beauté un nouveau chapitre de sa carrière. Portrait.



Advertising